Welcome to

Saint Lucia

Welcome to

A foreword by Honorable Dominic Fedee, Minister for Tourism, Information and Broadcasting, Culture and Creative Industries

Dear Reader,

Welcome to the Land of Inspiration and the World’s Leading Honeymoon Destination. Saint Lucia offers a full range of travel experiences that are both awe-inspiring and sustainable. As one of the Caribbean’s fastest developing nations, our efforts remain geared towards responsible growth and expansion of the industry.

Saint Lucia is known for its natural beauty and diverse attractions, including the signature Piton Mountains – a UNESCO World Heritage Site – 19,000 acres of tropical rainforest and one of the world’s few drive-in volcanoes.

Saint Lucia boasts itself, as the events capital of the Caribbean delivering several events under the Saint Lucia Summer Festival calendar. From Jazz, to Carnival, Roots & Soul and Food & Rum, there is something for everyone. This is especially an exciting year for the Atlantic Rally for Cruisers (ARC) and the World Cruising Club as the 2019 edition of the event celebrates 30 years of collaboration.

As you soak up all that Saint Lucia has to offer beyond the beauty and the extraordinary spirit of Her people, we once again welcome you to our piece of paradise and look forward to welcoming you back to our beautiful shores.

Let Her inspire you!

Sincerely,

Honorable Dominic Fedee

Getting to Saint Lucia by Air
Arriving in Saint Lucia by Boat

Welcome to

Saint Lucia

Welcome to

A foreword by Honorable Dominic Fedee, Minister for Tourism, Information and Broadcasting, Culture and Creative Industries

Dear Reader,

Welcome to the Land of Inspiration and the World’s Leading Honeymoon Destination. Saint Lucia offers a full range of travel experiences that are both awe-inspiring and sustainable. As one of the Caribbean’s fastest developing nations, our efforts remain geared towards responsible growth and expansion of the industry.

Saint Lucia is known for its natural beauty and diverse attractions, including the signature Piton Mountains – a UNESCO World Heritage Site – 19,000 acres of tropical rainforest and one of the world’s few drive-in volcanoes.

Saint Lucia boasts itself, as the events capital of the Caribbean delivering several events under the Saint Lucia Summer Festival calendar. From Jazz, to Carnival, Roots & Soul and Food & Rum, there is something for everyone. This is especially an exciting year for the Atlantic Rally for Cruisers (ARC) and the World Cruising Club as the 2019 edition of the event celebrates 30 years of collaboration.

As you soak up all that Saint Lucia has to offer beyond the beauty and the extraordinary spirit of Her people, we once again welcome you to our piece of paradise and look forward to welcoming you back to our beautiful shores.

Let Her inspire you!

Sincerely,

Honorable Dominic Fedee

Getting to Saint Lucia by Air
Arriving in Saint Lucia by Boat

Ki sa ou di?”

“mwen la.”

You might hear these words when you walk into a Saint Lucian bar, thirsty for a rum punch, or as you jump ashore onto dry land for the first time in weeks at Rodney Bay Marina after cruising the Atlantic.
Continue reading…

Ki sa ou di?”

“mwen la.”

You might hear these words when you walk into a Saint Lucian bar, thirsty for a rum punch, or as you jump ashore onto dry land for the first time in weeks at Rodney Bay Marina after cruising the Atlantic.
Continue reading…

In Saint Lucian Patois, “ki sa ou di?” means, “What you say?” and is a greeting to find out more about where you have been and what you have been doing.

It will usually be accompanied with a broad smile and an outstretched hand. You see, Saint Lucians are really friendly.

This comes up whenever you talk to people who have visited Saint Lucia. They could be cruise visitors who have popped in for a day ashore, people from other Caribbean islands who have come seeking work, newlyweds who spent their honeymoon on this paradise island or the skippers and crews of the yachts and megayachts that fill the country’s coves and marinas. With a population a shade under 170,000 living on an island that measures just 27 miles long and 14 miles wide at its broadest point, everyone really does know everyone.

It means that if you need something done – a trek organised, a sail fixed or a table booked at a popular restaurant – someone will know someone, probably a family or a friend, who can do it. It is a country of great natural beauty – its raindrop shape hints at the
precipitation that keeps the forests of the interior so green and the waterfalls that are dotted around the country at full flow.

Saint Lucia’s landscapes have also been shaped by other forces of nature, notably volcanism. Its most famous landmarks, the Pitons at Soufrière, are a pair of dormant volcanic plugs and the gurgling and steaming pools of the world’s only drive-in volcano show that these forces continue to work their magic. This natural beauty is part of the reason Saint Lucia has been named the world’s best honeymoon destination year after year and it is easy to see why. Resorts like Cap Maison, Viceroy Sugar Beach and Ladera know only too well how important it is to look after newly wed couples. And their suites are designed to make honeymooners feel they have the best room in the house – a private plunge pool with a view of the Pitons, a double swing on the balcony or vast rainforest showers with plenty of space for two would make anyone feel loved up. Travellers come to Saint Lucia for plenty of other reasons too.

In Saint Lucian Patois, “ki sa ou di?” means, “What you say?” and is a greeting to find out more about where you have been and what you have been doing.

It will usually be accompanied with a broad smile and an outstretched hand. You see, Saint Lucians are really friendly.

This comes up whenever you talk to people who have visited Saint Lucia. They could be cruise visitors who have popped in for a day ashore, people from other Caribbean islands who have come seeking work, newlyweds who spent their honeymoon on this paradise island or the skippers and crews of the yachts and megayachts that fill the country’s coves and marinas. With a population a shade under 170,000 living on an island that measures just 27 miles long and 14 miles wide at its broadest point, everyone really does know everyone.

It means that if you need something done – a trek organised, a sail fixed or a table booked at a popular restaurant – someone will know someone, probably a family or a friend, who can do it. It is a country of great natural beauty – its raindrop shape hints at the
precipitation that keeps the forests of the interior so green and the waterfalls that are dotted around the country at full flow.

Saint Lucia’s landscapes have also been shaped by other forces of nature, notably volcanism. Its most famous landmarks, the Pitons at Soufrière, are a pair of dormant volcanic plugs and the gurgling and steaming pools of the world’s only drive-in volcano show that these forces continue to work their magic. This natural beauty is part of the reason Saint Lucia has been named the world’s best honeymoon destination year after year and it is easy to see why. Resorts like Cap Maison, Viceroy Sugar Beach and Ladera know only too well how important it is to look after newly wed couples. And their suites are designed to make honeymooners feel they have the best room in the house – a private plunge pool with a view of the Pitons, a double swing on the balcony or vast rainforest showers with plenty of space for two would make anyone feel loved up. Travellers come to Saint Lucia for plenty of other reasons too.

There are the epic treks across the mountainous interior or kite surfing on a perfect crescent of beach followed by a beer in the bar where Amy Winehouse found an escape from her crazy world. On the subject of music, there is so much here – soca, steel pan, reggae, even country and western. Sailors will find Saint Lucia a perfect stop on their Caribbean itineraries – safe from the hurricanes that afflict the islands further north and with marinas and other yacht services that are best in class.

The country celebrated its 40th anniversary of independence in 2019 but it knows that it is part of the bigger picture – whether as one of the Windward Islands, the wider West Indies, part of the Commonwealth or as an island nation that is doing its bit towards helping protect the environment. Saint Lucia also knows it must carry on growing. It is already a popular tourism destination but its unique attractions mean more people want to come – that means better air links, an airport fit for the future, more of those amazing hotel rooms and an infrastructure that makes it a pleasure to visit.

When someone says ki sa ou di, the reply is often “mwen la” – I am here. When here is Saint Lucia, there really is no need to be anywhere else.

The race of a lifetime

There are the epic treks across the mountainous interior or kite surfing on a perfect crescent of beach followed by a beer in the bar where Amy Winehouse found an escape from her crazy world. On the subject of music, there is so much here – soca, steel pan, reggae, even country and western. Sailors will find Saint Lucia a perfect stop on their Caribbean itineraries – safe from the hurricanes that afflict the islands further north and with marinas and other yacht services that are best in class.

The country celebrated its 40th anniversary of independence in 2019 but it knows that it is part of the bigger picture – whether as one of the Windward Islands, the wider West Indies, part of the Commonwealth or as an island nation that is doing its bit towards helping protect the environment. Saint Lucia also knows it must carry on growing. It is already a popular tourism destination but its unique attractions mean more people want to come – that means better air links, an airport fit for the future, more of those amazing hotel rooms and an infrastructure that makes it a pleasure to visit.

When someone says ki sa ou di, the reply is often “mwen la” – I am here. When here is Saint Lucia, there really is no need to be anywhere else.

The race of a lifetime

There are the epic treks across the mountainous interior or kite surfing on a perfect crescent of beach followed by a beer in the bar where Amy Winehouse found an escape from her crazy world. On the subject of music, there is so much here – soca, steel pan, reggae, even country and western. Sailors will find Saint Lucia a perfect stop on their Caribbean itineraries – safe from the hurricanes that afflict the islands further north and with marinas and other yacht services that are best in class.

The country celebrated its 40th anniversary of independence in 2019 but it knows that it is part of the bigger picture – whether as one of the Windward Islands, the wider West Indies, part of the Commonwealth or as an island nation that is doing its bit towards helping protect the environment. Saint Lucia also knows it must carry on growing. It is already a popular tourism destination but its unique attractions mean more people want to come – that means better air links, an airport fit for the future, more of those amazing hotel rooms and an infrastructure that makes it a pleasure to visit.

When someone says ki sa ou di, the reply is often “mwen la” – I am here. When here is Saint Lucia, there really is no need to be anywhere else.

The race of a lifetime

Getting to Saint Lucia

BY AIR

It has never been easier to visit Saint Lucia, with convenient non-stop flights on all major US carriers. There are also numerous flight schedules that offer easy, seamless connections through various hubs and from feeder cities throughout the continental US.

There’s a twice daily service from Miami International on American Airlines and non-stop daily service from Atlanta on Delta Airlines. Beginning December 21st American Airlines fly non stop from Chicago. Clients looking to escape New York and Boston this winter have the luxury of daily non-stop flights from JFK and Logan International with flat beds in Mint Service by Jet Blue Airlines.

United Airlines offers non-stop weekly service from Chicago’s O’Hare International and also weekly non-stop service from Newark’s Liberty International Airport. The flight schedule Saint Lucia now boasts, conveniently allows easy connections for west coast clients who can fly into the hub of their choice and make it to the beach in Saint Lucia as early as mid-afternoon. From Toronto Canada, Air Canada, West Jet and Sunwing fly non-stop to Saint Lucia through until Spring.

From the 2020 summer season, British Airways (www.ba.com) will up the frequency of its service from the UK to Saint Lucia to nine flights a week over the summer. There are also weekly services from TUI flying every Tuesday. The flight time is nine hours.

George F.L. Charles Airport
Hewanorra International Airport

Click me!

Saint Lucia Activities

Getting to Saint Lucia

BY AIR

It has never been easier to visit Saint Lucia, with convenient non-stop flights on all major US carriers. There are also numerous flight schedules that offer easy, seamless connections through various hubs and from feeder cities throughout the continental US.

There’s a twice daily service from Miami International on American Airlines and non-stop daily service from Atlanta on Delta Airlines. Beginning December 21st American Airlines fly non stop from Chicago. Clients looking to escape New York and Boston this winter have the luxury of daily non-stop flights from JFK and Logan International with flat beds in Mint Service by Jet Blue Airlines.

United Airlines offers non-stop weekly service from Chicago’s O’Hare International and also weekly non-stop service from Newark’s Liberty International Airport. The flight schedule Saint Lucia now boasts, conveniently allows easy connections for west coast clients who can fly into the hub of their choice and make it to the beach in Saint Lucia as early as mid-afternoon. From Toronto Canada, Air Canada, West Jet and Sunwing fly non-stop to Saint Lucia through until Spring.

From the 2020 summer season, British Airways (www.ba.com) will up the frequency of its service from the UK to Saint Lucia to nine flights a week over the summer. There are also weekly services from TUI flying every Tuesday. The flight time is nine hours.

George F.L. Charles Airport
Hewanorra International Airport

Click me!

Saint Lucia Activities

Getting to Saint Lucia

BY AIR

It has never been easier to visit Saint Lucia, with convenient non-stop flights on all major US carriers. There are also numerous flight schedules that offer easy, seamless connections through various hubs and from feeder cities throughout the continental US.

There’s a twice daily service from Miami International on American Airlines and non-stop daily service from Atlanta on Delta Airlines. Beginning December 21st American Airlines fly non stop from Chicago. Clients looking to escape New York and Boston this winter have the luxury of daily non-stop flights from JFK and Logan International with flat beds in Mint Service by Jet Blue Airlines.

United Airlines offers non-stop weekly service from Chicago’s O’Hare International and also weekly non-stop service from Newark’s Liberty International Airport. The flight schedule Saint Lucia now boasts, conveniently allows easy connections for west coast clients who can fly into the hub of their choice and make it to the beach in Saint Lucia as early as mid-afternoon. From Toronto Canada, Air Canada, West Jet and Sunwing fly non-stop to Saint Lucia through until Spring.

From the 2020 summer season, British Airways (www.ba.com) will up the frequency of its service from the UK to Saint Lucia to nine flights a week over the summer. There are also weekly services from TUI flying every Tuesday. The flight time is nine hours.

George F.L. Charles Airport
Hewanorra International Airport

Click me!

Saint Lucia Activities

Andrew Bishop, managing director of the World Cruising Club

The race

OF A LIFETIME

For thousands of amateur sailors from across the world, the ARC has made the dream of sailing some 2,700 nautical miles across the Atlantic a reality, writes Ginny Light.

The ARC event was conceived by
yachting journalist Jimmy Cornell in 1986 who was enthused by the tales of excitement and camaraderie told to him by skippers who had completed the transatlantic passage.

Thirty-four years on, the present-day event between Las Palmas de Gran Canaria and Rodney Bay, Saint Lucia, is still true to its roots. The ARC offers a safety net of support to amateur sailors, together with the fun of friendly competition.

Andrew Bishop, managing director of World Cruising Club, organisers of the ARC, says: “The ARC is an amazing event, which each year brings together a diverse group of international crews to sail across the Atlantic. I am delighted that this year we have six young Saint Lucians participating as part of our ARC Youth Team, a World Cruising Club
initiative to help mark this special year.”

The first event, ARC’86, set a record for the largest transocean race ever staged, when 204 yachts set off from Gran Canaria. The 2019 event will see up to 300 yachts take part as the event now offers two starting points, with ARC+ participants going via the Cape Verde islands and setting off two weeks earlier.

All of the participants finish at Rodney Bay, Saint Lucia, where the marina is able to accommodate all of the yachts at the end of the rally. This makes for an electric atmosphere of jubilation and esprit de corps as crews cheer their compatriots across the finish line.

While the entrants in the Racing
Division jostle to beat the ARC course record of 8 days, 6 hours, 29 minutes and 15 seconds, set in 2016, the majority of boats are in the Cruising Division, where finish times take into account any hours of motoring. In this category, aside from prizes for the fastest crew, there are also awards for the fastest family boat, the oldest boat, and even the last to arrive in Rodney Bay.

Says Bishop: “The ARC is a tremendous event, and seeing
participants celebrate their achievement on arrival into Rodney Bay is always a very special moment for those of us ashore. ARC flags continue to fly long after the rally has finished, fostering the many long term friendships that are formed during the event. I’ve seen much change over the years, but the warmth of the Caribbean welcome on arrival and the camaraderie amongst the participants are constants that help make the ARC so special.”

Andrew Bishop, managing director of the World Cruising Club

The race

OF A LIFETIME

For thousands of amateur sailors from across the world, the ARC has made the dream of sailing some 2,700 nautical miles across the Atlantic a reality, writes Ginny Light.

The ARC event was conceived by
yachting journalist Jimmy Cornell in 1986 who was enthused by the tales of excitement and camaraderie told to him by skippers who had completed the transatlantic passage.

Thirty-four years on, the present-day event between Las Palmas de Gran Canaria and Rodney Bay, Saint Lucia, is still true to its roots. The ARC offers a safety net of support to amateur sailors, together with the fun of friendly competition.

Andrew Bishop, managing director of World Cruising Club, organisers of the ARC, says: “The ARC is an amazing event, which each year brings together a diverse group of international crews to sail across the Atlantic. I am delighted that this year we have six young Saint Lucians participating as part of our ARC Youth Team, a World Cruising Club
initiative to help mark this special year.”

The first event, ARC’86, set a record for the largest transocean race ever staged, when 204 yachts set off from Gran Canaria. The 2019 event will see up to 300 yachts take part as the event now offers two starting points, with ARC+ participants going via the Cape Verde islands and setting off two weeks earlier.

All of the participants finish at Rodney Bay, Saint Lucia, where the marina is able to accommodate all of the yachts at the end of the rally. This makes for an electric atmosphere of jubilation and esprit de corps as crews cheer their compatriots across the finish line.

While the entrants in the Racing
Division jostle to beat the ARC course record of 8 days, 6 hours, 29 minutes and 15 seconds, set in 2016, the majority of boats are in the Cruising Division, where finish times take into account any hours of motoring. In this category, aside from prizes for the fastest crew, there are also awards for the fastest family boat, the oldest boat, and even the last to arrive in Rodney Bay.

Says Bishop: “The ARC is a tremendous event, and seeing
participants celebrate their achievement on arrival into Rodney Bay is always a very special moment for those of us ashore. ARC flags continue to fly long after the rally has finished, fostering the many long term friendships that are formed during the event. I’ve seen much change over the years, but the warmth of the Caribbean welcome on arrival and the camaraderie amongst the participants are constants that help make the ARC so special.”

Andrew Bishop, managing director of the World Cruising Club

The race

OF A LIFETIME

For thousands of amateur sailors from across the world, the ARC has made the dream of sailing some 2,700 nautical miles across the Atlantic a reality, writes Ginny Light.

The ARC event was conceived by
yachting journalist Jimmy Cornell in 1986 who was enthused by the tales of excitement and camaraderie told to him by skippers who had completed the transatlantic passage.

Thirty-four years on, the present-day event between Las Palmas de Gran Canaria and Rodney Bay, Saint Lucia, is still true to its roots. The ARC offers a safety net of support to amateur sailors, together with the fun of friendly competition.

Andrew Bishop, managing director of World Cruising Club, organisers of the ARC, says: “The ARC is an amazing event, which each year brings together a diverse group of international crews to sail across the Atlantic. I am delighted that this year we have six young Saint Lucians participating as part of our ARC Youth Team, a World Cruising Club
initiative to help mark this special year.”

The first event, ARC’86, set a record for the largest transocean race ever staged, when 204 yachts set off from Gran Canaria. The 2019 event will see up to 300 yachts take part as the event now offers two starting points, with ARC+ participants going via the Cape Verde islands and setting off two weeks earlier.

All of the participants finish at Rodney Bay, Saint Lucia, where the marina is able to accommodate all of the yachts at the end of the rally. This makes for an electric atmosphere of jubilation and esprit de corps as crews cheer their compatriots across the finish line.

While the entrants in the Racing
Division jostle to beat the ARC course record of 8 days, 6 hours, 29 minutes and 15 seconds, set in 2016, the majority of boats are in the Cruising Division, where finish times take into account any hours of motoring. In this category, aside from prizes for the fastest crew, there are also awards for the fastest family boat, the oldest boat, and even the last to arrive in Rodney Bay.

Says Bishop: “The ARC is a tremendous event, and seeing
participants celebrate their achievement on arrival into Rodney Bay is always a very special moment for those of us ashore. ARC flags continue to fly long after the rally has finished, fostering the many long term friendships that are formed during the event. I’ve seen much change over the years, but the warmth of the Caribbean welcome on arrival and the camaraderie amongst the participants are constants that help make the ARC so special.”

Eyes on

the prize

Setting off in high hopes, to the rousing accompaniment of a Canaries band and choir, Rory and Susie McGrath (above) sailed out from Las Palmas harbour on 22 November 2015, to begin their first ARC aboard Dalliance, their Oyster 62’. With shouts of good luck from the neighbouring boats, the couple, whose previous sailing experience had not taken them beyond the English Channel and the Mediterranean, rapidly embarked on the steep learning curve of ocean sailing. This ranged from replacing the broken outhaul of the mainsail mid-ocean to putting a dish full of chicken stew into a wildly swinging gimballed stove without throwing the much-anticipated dinner across the galley.

The greatest revelation for the couple and their crew, though, was the extraordinary diversity of ocean life. “On day six, Susie and I were up early for a watch. Over my shoulder there was a beautiful sunrise and over my right a spectacular lightning storm. It is an ocean of opposites,” says Rory. Dalliance was frequently accompanied by pods of dolphin, vast silvery swordfish and shoals of flying fish at the bow.

With no land or other people in sight, life on the ocean was a moment for reflection. “The nights were beautiful – myriad stars with no light pollution to spoil it and just the wind blowing us onward – much as it must have done to Columbus’ ships centuries ago,” says Susie.

Though competing in the Cruising Division of the ARC, there was one prize that the Dalliance crew were eyeing – Rory wagered four bottles of wine with a rival boat as to who would finish first, and another four for the largest fish landed. After many thwarted attempts at fishing for supper, the crew caught a two-foot long electric green dorada with blue fins, but it slipped out of their grasp before it could hit the frying pan. Their rivals soon radioed to report having landed a 21kg swordfish, so that bet was lost, although fresh dorada did make it onto the dinner plates, much to the crew’s delight on day six.

On day 15, a euphoric Dalliance crew were anticipating waking up to the final stretch into Rodney Bay marina. “I was also looking forward to the solid ground, green slopes and bustling harbour of Saint Lucia as well as the prawns, crab and lobster in the Caribbean after the fresh fish and our fishing luck ran out by day 10,” said Susie.

Though their rivals crossed the finish line first, the achievement of having complete the profound challenge of sailing across the Atlantic was elation enough. Far from the technology and shortcuts of modern life, the planning, preparation, camaraderie and sheer endurance of it was joyful – to step into the unknown and then to arrive safely into harbour – anextraordinary
accomplishment.

Eyes on

the prize

Setting off in high hopes, to the rousing accompaniment of a Canaries band and choir, Rory and Susie McGrath (above) sailed out from Las Palmas harbour on 22 November 2015, to begin their first ARC aboard Dalliance, their Oyster 62’. With shouts of good luck from the neighbouring boats, the couple, whose previous sailing experience had not taken them beyond the English Channel and the Mediterranean, rapidly embarked on the steep learning curve of ocean sailing. This ranged from replacing the broken outhaul of the mainsail mid-ocean to putting a dish full of chicken stew into a wildly swinging gimballed stove without throwing the much-anticipated dinner across the galley.

The greatest revelation for the couple and their crew, though, was the extraordinary diversity of ocean life. “On day six, Susie and I were up early for a watch. Over my shoulder there was a beautiful sunrise and over my right a spectacular lightning storm. It is an ocean of opposites,” says Rory. Dalliance was frequently accompanied by pods of dolphin, vast silvery swordfish and shoals of flying fish at the bow.

With no land or other people in sight, life on the ocean was a moment for reflection. “The nights were beautiful – myriad stars with no light pollution to spoil it and just the wind blowing us onward – much as it must have done to Columbus’ ships centuries ago,” says Susie.

Though competing in the Cruising Division of the ARC, there was one prize that the Dalliance crew were eyeing – Rory wagered four bottles of wine with a rival boat as to who would finish first, and another four for the largest fish landed. After many thwarted attempts at fishing for supper, the crew caught a two-foot long electric green dorada with blue fins, but it slipped out of their grasp before it could hit the frying pan. Their rivals soon radioed to report having landed a 21kg swordfish, so that bet was lost, although fresh dorada did make it onto the dinner plates, much to the crew’s delight on day six.

On day 15, a euphoric Dalliance crew were anticipating waking up to the final stretch into Rodney Bay marina. “I was also looking forward to the solid ground, green slopes and bustling harbour of Saint Lucia as well as the prawns, crab and lobster in the Caribbean after the fresh fish and our fishing luck ran out by day 10,” said Susie.

Though their rivals crossed the finish line first, the achievement of having complete the profound challenge of sailing across the Atlantic was elation enough. Far from the technology and shortcuts of modern life, the planning, preparation, camaraderie and sheer endurance of it was joyful – to step into the unknown and then to arrive safely into harbour – anextraordinary
accomplishment.

Eyes on

the prize

Setting off in high hopes, to the rousing accompaniment of a Canaries band and choir, Rory and Susie McGrath (above) sailed out from Las Palmas harbour on 22 November 2015, to begin their first ARC aboard Dalliance, their Oyster 62’. With shouts of good luck from the neighbouring boats, the couple, whose previous sailing experience had not taken them beyond the English Channel and the Mediterranean, rapidly embarked on the steep learning curve of ocean sailing. This ranged from replacing the broken outhaul of the mainsail mid-ocean to putting a dish full of chicken stew into a wildly swinging gimballed stove without throwing the much-anticipated dinner across the galley.

The greatest revelation for the couple and their crew, though, was the extraordinary diversity of ocean life. “On day six, Susie and I were up early for a watch. Over my shoulder there was a beautiful sunrise and over my right a spectacular lightning storm. It is an ocean of opposites,” says Rory. Dalliance was frequently accompanied by pods of dolphin, vast silvery swordfish and shoals of flying fish at the bow.

With no land or other people in sight, life on the ocean was a moment for reflection. “The nights were beautiful – myriad stars with no light pollution to spoil it and just the wind blowing us onward – much as it must have done to Columbus’ ships centuries ago,” says Susie.

Though competing in the Cruising Division of the ARC, there was one prize that the Dalliance crew were eyeing – Rory wagered four bottles of wine with a rival boat as to who would finish first, and another four for the largest fish landed. After many thwarted attempts at fishing for supper, the crew caught a two-foot long electric green dorada with blue fins, but it slipped out of their grasp before it could hit the frying pan. Their rivals soon radioed to report having landed a 21kg swordfish, so that bet was lost, although fresh dorada did make it onto the dinner plates, much to the crew’s delight on day six.

On day 15, a euphoric Dalliance crew were anticipating waking up to the final stretch into Rodney Bay marina. “I was also looking forward to the solid ground, green slopes and bustling harbour of Saint Lucia as well as the prawns, crab and lobster in the Caribbean after the fresh fish and our fishing luck ran out by day 10,” said Susie.

Though their rivals crossed the finish line first, the achievement of having complete the profound challenge of sailing across the Atlantic was elation enough. Far from the technology and shortcuts of modern life, the planning, preparation, camaraderie and sheer endurance of it was joyful – to step into the unknown and then to arrive safely into harbour – anextraordinary
accomplishment.

Dan and Em Bowers on board Skyelark of London

Las Palmas marina. Photo: Graham Van’t Hoff

People come

FOR ADVENTURE

Dan Bowers is a full-time professional skipper, with over 200,000 nautical miles made under various keels, including 24 transatlantics, 2 transpacifics, multiple Caribbean circuits, several laps of the Mediterranean, and too many cross-channel trips to mention.

Dan’s wife Emily is a real water baby, there are few places that she hasn’t sailed with over 250,000 nautical miles covered! Very much at home at sea, she has sailed 26 transatlantics, crossed the pacific three times and taken part in the RORC round Britain and Ireland race – a fun challenge as skipper of an all-female crew. She has also spent many years on Global Challenge yachts, most notably sailing from the UK to Antarctica in 1999.

My first introduction to the ARC was back in 2000. I had just finished school and was taking a gap year. This involved doing some volunteer work for the Ocean Youth Trust and while I was there, I heard someone talking about doing a transatlantic sailing trip. This sounded like a great way to see the world and I was lucky enough to find someone willing to take responsibility for a green 18-year-old on his first big sailing adventure. We spent six months sailing from Scotland to the Caribbean on the ‘Atlantic circuit’ of which the ARC is the main event.

Fast forward to 2008 and my wife Em and I are back on the ARC. This was our first charter as we launched our adventure sailing business on Skyelark of London, offering pay-to-play spaces for yachties to experience ocean passages and adventure sailing trips (see skye51.com for more on this). 11 years, 10 ARCs and 2 World ARCS later, we are a familiar sight in Rodney Bay marina at the end of the ARC, and the amazing welcome and friendliness of the Saint Lucians never gets old.

We consider the island to be a second home as we have spent so many winters there and made great friends. We love the mountains whether it’s the Pitons, Mount Gymie or the lookout at Pigeon Island and we can often be found kiting at Cas-en-Bas, shopping at the Gros Islet fish co-op or tucking into a roti.

We have introduced over a hundred crews to sailing the Atlantic, and I think the most unexpected part of the crossing is the crew bonding. People come for the adventure, the sense of remoteness, isolation, nature and time to reflect. They expect a bit of hardship and to prove themselves on a challenge, but even so you would think throwing eight ‘strangers’ into a small boat, depriving them of sleep and life’s luxuries sounds like a plan for extreme reality TV. But the reality is shared experience and the time for simple conversations deepen those connections of like-minded people, and the surprise for many is that they form very good friendships. Our ARC crews regularly have reunions so they can reminisce about their life enhancing adventure. The sense of accomplishment as you cross the finish line, and of course the Lucian rum punch.

If we have any advice for first timers it’s to get the crew right. Whether they are lifelong friends or strangers, you need to spend time together beforehand and time on a boat. Your drinking buddy or squash friend that you socialise with every week, is not necessarily someone you want to camp with for a month.

Sailing experience isn’t essential – a good captain can teach that, but you can’t change personalities. For us one of the nicest aspects is the crew bonding, but it’s not so good if you get it wrong.

Make time to do some research. The organisers – World Cruising Club – put an amazing amount of information into their rally handbook, as well as putting on seminars and question panels on the ground in Las Palmas and beforehand in the UK. They have seen everything before and the more you use this resource and plan ahead, the smoother and more enjoyable the crossing. This is what makes the ARC a success, and so different from doing it on your own.

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Dan and Em Bowers on board Skyelark of London

Las Palmas marina. Photo: Graham Van’t Hoff

People come

FOR ADVENTURE

Dan Bowers is a full-time professional skipper, with over 200,000 nautical miles made under various keels, including 24 transatlantics, 2 transpacifics, multiple Caribbean circuits, several laps of the Mediterranean, and too many cross-channel trips to mention.

Dan’s wife Emily is a real water baby, there are few places that she hasn’t sailed with over 250,000 nautical miles covered! Very much at home at sea, she has sailed 26 transatlantics, crossed the pacific three times and taken part in the RORC round Britain and Ireland race – a fun challenge as skipper of an all-female crew. She has also spent many years on Global Challenge yachts, most notably sailing from the UK to Antarctica in 1999.

My first introduction to the ARC was back in 2000. I had just finished school and was taking a gap year. This involved doing some volunteer work for the Ocean Youth Trust and while I was there, I heard someone talking about doing a transatlantic sailing trip. This sounded like a great way to see the world and I was lucky enough to find someone willing to take responsibility for a green 18-year-old on his first big sailing adventure. We spent six months sailing from Scotland to the Caribbean on the ‘Atlantic circuit’ of which the ARC is the main event.

Fast forward to 2008 and my wife Em and I are back on the ARC. This was our first charter as we launched our adventure sailing business on Skyelark of London, offering pay-to-play spaces for yachties to experience ocean passages and adventure sailing trips (see skye51.com for more on this). 11 years, 10 ARCs and 2 World ARCS later, we are a familiar sight in Rodney Bay marina at the end of the ARC, and the amazing welcome and friendliness of the Saint Lucians never gets old.

We consider the island to be a second home as we have spent so many winters there and made great friends. We love the mountains whether it’s the Pitons, Mount Gymie or the lookout at Pigeon Island and we can often be found kiting at Cas-en-Bas, shopping at the Gros Islet fish co-op or tucking into a roti.

We have introduced over a hundred crews to sailing the Atlantic, and I think the most unexpected part of the crossing is the crew bonding. People come for the adventure, the sense of remoteness, isolation, nature and time to reflect. They expect a bit of hardship and to prove themselves on a challenge, but even so you would think throwing eight ‘strangers’ into a small boat, depriving them of sleep and life’s luxuries sounds like a plan for extreme reality TV. But the reality is shared experience and the time for simple conversations deepen those connections of like-minded people, and the surprise for many is that they form very good friendships. Our ARC crews regularly have reunions so they can reminisce about their life enhancing adventure. The sense of accomplishment as you cross the finish line, and of course the Lucian rum punch.

If we have any advice for first timers it’s to get the crew right. Whether they are lifelong friends or strangers, you need to spend time together beforehand and time on a boat. Your drinking buddy or squash friend that you socialise with every week, is not necessarily someone you want to camp with for a month.

Sailing experience isn’t essential – a good captain can teach that, but you can’t change personalities. For us one of the nicest aspects is the crew bonding, but it’s not so good if you get it wrong.

Make time to do some research. The organisers – World Cruising Club – put an amazing amount of information into their rally handbook, as well as putting on seminars and question panels on the ground in Las Palmas and beforehand in the UK. They have seen everything before and the more you use this resource and plan ahead, the smoother and more enjoyable the crossing. This is what makes the ARC a success, and so different from doing it on your own.

Read more articles

Dan and Em Bowers on board Skyelark of London

Las Palmas marina. Photo: Graham Van’t Hoff

People come

FOR ADVENTURE

Dan Bowers is a full-time professional skipper, with over 200,000 nautical miles made under various keels, including 24 transatlantics, 2 transpacifics, multiple Caribbean circuits, several laps of the Mediterranean, and too many cross-channel trips to mention.

Dan’s wife Emily is a real water baby, there are few places that she hasn’t sailed with over 250,000 nautical miles covered! Very much at home at sea, she has sailed 26 transatlantics, crossed the pacific three times and taken part in the RORC round Britain and Ireland race – a fun challenge as skipper of an all-female crew. She has also spent many years on Global Challenge yachts, most notably sailing from the UK to Antarctica in 1999.

My first introduction to the ARC was back in 2000. I had just finished school and was taking a gap year. This involved doing some volunteer work for the Ocean Youth Trust and while I was there, I heard someone talking about doing a transatlantic sailing trip. This sounded like a great way to see the world and I was lucky enough to find someone willing to take responsibility for a green 18-year-old on his first big sailing adventure. We spent six months sailing from Scotland to the Caribbean on the ‘Atlantic circuit’ of which the ARC is the main event.

Fast forward to 2008 and my wife Em and I are back on the ARC. This was our first charter as we launched our adventure sailing business on Skyelark of London, offering pay-to-play spaces for yachties to experience ocean passages and adventure sailing trips (see skye51.com for more on this). 11 years, 10 ARCs and 2 World ARCS later, we are a familiar sight in Rodney Bay marina at the end of the ARC, and the amazing welcome and friendliness of the Saint Lucians never gets old.

We consider the island to be a second home as we have spent so many winters there and made great friends. We love the mountains whether it’s the Pitons, Mount Gymie or the lookout at Pigeon Island and we can often be found kiting at Cas-en-Bas, shopping at the Gros Islet fish co-op or tucking into a roti.

We have introduced over a hundred crews to sailing the Atlantic, and I think the most unexpected part of the crossing is the crew bonding. People come for the adventure, the sense of remoteness, isolation, nature and time to reflect. They expect a bit of hardship and to prove themselves on a challenge, but even so you would think throwing eight ‘strangers’ into a small boat, depriving them of sleep and life’s luxuries sounds like a plan for extreme reality TV. But the reality is shared experience and the time for simple conversations deepen those connections of like-minded people, and the surprise for many is that they form very good friendships. Our ARC crews regularly have reunions so they can reminisce about their life enhancing adventure. The sense of accomplishment as you cross the finish line, and of course the Lucian rum punch.

If we have any advice for first timers it’s to get the crew right. Whether they are lifelong friends or strangers, you need to spend time together beforehand and time on a boat. Your drinking buddy or squash friend that you socialise with every week, is not necessarily someone you want to camp with for a month.

Sailing experience isn’t essential – a good captain can teach that, but you can’t change personalities. For us one of the nicest aspects is the crew bonding, but it’s not so good if you get it wrong.

Make time to do some research. The organisers – World Cruising Club – put an amazing amount of information into their rally handbook, as well as putting on seminars and question panels on the ground in Las Palmas and beforehand in the UK. They have seen everything before and the more you use this resource and plan ahead, the smoother and more enjoyable the crossing. This is what makes the ARC a success, and so different from doing it on your own.

Read more articles

Arriving in Saint Lucia

BY BOAT

Rodney Bay, Castries, Marigot, Soufriere and Vieux-Fort are all ports of entry. You are required by law to fill out an immigration form and check into the island within 24 hours of arrival. In the event that customs and immigration office is closed you must remain on your vessel or on the compound of the marina until you get clearance.

Get clearance in and out upon arrival for stay up to three (3) days with the same crew. Prior to checking in, complete your immigration form online using SailClear. Doing this may save you a lot of time at Customs. Boat owners and registered crew members are normally given six (6) months entry and if you would like to extend, you can do so in person at the main Customs and Immigration office in Castries (fees apply).

Do remember to dress appropriately when going for clearance and be sure to carry with you:

Ship’s registration showing ownership and nature of business in which the vessel is primarily engaged

Clearance documentation for last port prior to Saint Lucia 

Passports for all crew and passengers and any appropriate visas. 

For further information on visa requirements for Saint Lucia, please visit The Government of Saint Lucia website

Alternatively visit the St Lucia Archive

Visit Saint Lucia’s Air and Sea Ports Authority (SLASPA) for more information

Pre-arrival notification system for yachts for quick and easy customs clearance please visit: www.sailclear.com

Rodney Bay
Castries
Marigot Bay
Soufriere
Vieux Fort

Getting aroud

Saint Lucia

Saint Lucia is small – measuring only 27 miles long and 14 miles wide – but getting around by car can take time: the roads are mountainous and the occasional pothole slows you down.

The speed limit is typically 15mph (24 km/h) in towns (although the traffic through Castries often moves at a snail’s pace) and 30mph (48km/h) in the countryside. A handful of highways have a limit of 40mph (64km/h). You drive on the left in Saint Lucia – the same as in the UK – although when going round mountain bends you may meet traffic on your side of the road so keep vigilant.

There are two major routes between the airport and the north of the island. The Micoud Highway, which goes up the eastern coast, is typically quicker than the route along the west coast via Soufrière. The east route takes around an hour and ten minutes compared to two hours via the west.

There are a number of car rental firms at Hewanorra airport, including Sixt, Solo and Drive-A-Matic. Renters will need to obtain a temporary drivers permit; getting one is a formality if you have a valid driver’s licence in your home country.

If you prefer to take a taxi, expect to pay around US$70 to get from the airport to Castries or close to US$90-100 to get to Rodney Bay. Authorised taxis have a light blue number plate and the number starts with TX. Helicopter transfers are the quickest way between the two ends of the island. Expect to pay US$180 per person, based on four people travelling.

AdRef:HP3060

Customs

Opening
Hours

Monday – Thursday 8:00am – 4:30pm

Friday 8:00am – 6:00pm

Saturday – Sunday 8:00am – 4:30pm

Weekends & Holidays Overtime Hours
(after 4:30pm fees apply)

Port Entry Charges:
Passenger dues: EC$15/person.

These times might defer at the other ports of entry.

Arriving in Saint Lucia

BY BOAT

Rodney Bay, Castries, Marigot, Soufriere and Vieux-Fort are all ports of entry. You are required by law to fill out an immigration form and check into the island within 24 hours of arrival. In the event that customs and immigration office is closed you must remain on your vessel or on the compound of the marina until you get clearance.

Get clearance in and out upon arrival for stay up to three (3) days with the same crew. Prior to checking in, complete your immigration form online using SailClear. Doing this may save you a lot of time at Customs. Boat owners and registered crew members are normally given six (6) months entry and if you would like to extend, you can do so in person at the main Customs and Immigration office in Castries (fees apply).

Do remember to dress appropriately when going for clearance and be sure to carry with you:

Ship’s registration showing ownership and nature of business in which the vessel is primarily engaged

Clearance documentation for last port prior to Saint Lucia 

Passports for all crew and passengers and any appropriate visas. 

For further information on visa requirements for Saint Lucia, please visit The Government of Saint Lucia website

Alternatively visit the St Lucia Archive

Visit Saint Lucia’s Air and Sea Ports Authority (SLASPA) for more information

Pre-arrival notification system for yachts for quick and easy customs clearance please visit: www.sailclear.com

Rodney Bay
Castries
Marigot Bay
Soufriere
Vieux Fort

Getting aroud

Saint Lucia

Saint Lucia is small – measuring only 27 miles long and 14 miles wide – but getting around by car can take time: the roads are mountainous and the occasional pothole slows you down.

The speed limit is typically 15mph (24 km/h) in towns (although the traffic through Castries often moves at a snail’s pace) and 30mph (48km/h) in the countryside. A handful of highways have a limit of 40mph (64km/h). You drive on the left in Saint Lucia – the same as in the UK – although when going round mountain bends you may meet traffic on your side of the road so keep vigilant.

There are two major routes between the airport and the north of the island. The Micoud Highway, which goes up the eastern coast, is typically quicker than the route along the west coast via Soufrière. The east route takes around an hour and ten minutes compared to two hours via the west.

There are a number of car rental firms at Hewanorra airport, including Sixt, Solo and Drive-A-Matic. Renters will need to obtain a temporary drivers permit; getting one is a formality if you have a valid driver’s licence in your home country.

If you prefer to take a taxi, expect to pay around US$70 to get from the airport to Castries or close to US$90-100 to get to Rodney Bay. Authorised taxis have a light blue number plate and the number starts with TX. Helicopter transfers are the quickest way between the two ends of the island. Expect to pay US$180 per person, based on four people travelling.

AdRef:HP3060

Customs

Opening
Hours

Monday – Thursday 8:00am – 4:30pm

Friday 8:00am – 6:00pm

Saturday – Sunday 8:00am – 4:30pm

Weekends & Holidays Overtime Hours
(after 4:30pm fees apply)

Port Entry Charges:
Passenger dues: EC$15/person.

These times might defer at the other ports of entry.

Arriving in Saint Lucia

BY BOAT

Rodney Bay, Castries, Marigot, Soufriere and Vieux-Fort are all ports of entry. You are required by law to fill out an immigration form and check into the island within 24 hours of arrival. In the event that customs and immigration office is closed you must remain on your vessel or on the compound of the marina until you get clearance.

Get clearance in and out upon arrival for stay up to three (3) days with the same crew. Prior to checking in, complete your immigration form online using SailClear. Doing this may save you a lot of time at Customs. Boat owners and registered crew members are normally given six (6) months entry and if you would like to extend, you can do so in person at the main Customs and Immigration office in Castries (fees apply).

Do remember to dress appropriately when going for clearance and be sure to carry with you:

Ship’s registration showing ownership and nature of business in which the vessel is primarily engaged

Clearance documentation for last port prior to Saint Lucia 

Passports for all crew and passengers and any appropriate visas. 

For further information on visa requirements for Saint Lucia, please visit The Government of Saint Lucia website

Alternatively visit the St Lucia Archive

Visit Saint Lucia’s Air and Sea Ports Authority (SLASPA) for more information

Pre-arrival notification system for yachts for quick and easy customs clearance please visit: www.sailclear.com

Rodney Bay
Castries
Marigot Bay
Soufriere
Vieux Fort

Getting aroud

Saint Lucia

Saint Lucia is small – measuring only 27 miles long and 14 miles wide – but getting around by car can take time: the roads are mountainous and the occasional pothole slows you down.

The speed limit is typically 15mph (24 km/h) in towns (although the traffic through Castries often moves at a snail’s pace) and 30mph (48km/h) in the countryside. A handful of highways have a limit of 40mph (64km/h). You drive on the left in Saint Lucia – the same as in the UK – although when going round mountain bends you may meet traffic on your side of the road so keep vigilant.

There are two major routes between the airport and the north of the island. The Micoud Highway, which goes up the eastern coast, is typically quicker than the route along the west coast via Soufrière. The east route takes around an hour and ten minutes compared to two hours via the west.

There are a number of car rental firms at Hewanorra airport, including Sixt, Solo and Drive-A-Matic. Renters will need to obtain a temporary drivers permit; getting one is a formality if you have a valid driver’s licence in your home country.

If you prefer to take a taxi, expect to pay around US$70 to get from the airport to Castries or close to US$90-100 to get to Rodney Bay. Authorised taxis have a light blue number plate and the number starts with TX. Helicopter transfers are the quickest way between the two ends of the island. Expect to pay US$180 per person, based on four people travelling.

Customs

Opening
Hours

Monday – Thursday 8:00am – 4:30pm

Friday 8:00am – 6:00pm

Saturday – Sunday 8:00am – 4:30pm

Weekends & Holidays Overtime Hours
(after 4:30pm fees apply)

Port Entry Charges:
Passenger dues: EC$15/person.

These times might defer at the other ports of entry.

Landing in

GEORGE F.L. CHARLES AIRPORT

George F. L. Charles Airport is the smaller of the two airports located in Saint Lucia. It is 2 km north of the Castries.
Return to Airport listing

Landing in

HEWANORRA INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT

Hewanorra International Airport is located near Vieux Fort Quarter in Saint Lucia. It is the larger of Saint Lucia’s two airports, the other being George F.L. Charles Airport.
Return to Airport listing

A very

welcome sight

After 2,700 nautical miles of Atlantic, the sight of IGY’s Rodney Bay Marina is a very welcome one.

It is not just appealing to ARC race participants.

“The facility is self-contained. You have a boatyard, duty free fuel, customs and immigration and a duty-free chandlery,” says the marina’s general manager Sean Devaux.

Devaux speaks with an accent that defies easy placement. His father is from Trinidad, his mother from Canada but he grew up in Saint Lucia where the Devaux family has connections going back 275 years.

The marina’s duty-free status is particularly attractive.

“If your vessel is foreign registered then you will be allowed duty-free status. If you come across on the ARC and you have blown an engine or a sail, you can now bring that in duty free.”

Devaux is justifiably proud of the marina’s five gold anchor status as part of the global scheme operated by the Yacht Harbour Association and the Marina Industries Association.

KEY

1 IGY Rodney Bay marina
2 Rodney Bay Marina Boatyard
3 Rodney Bay Sails
4 Boardwalk Bar
5 Saint Lucia Tourism Authority
6 The Marketplace grocery store
7 Bay Gardens Hotel and Inn
8 Massy Stores supermarket
9 Spice of India
10 Tapas on the Bay
11 Jamrock Reggae Café and Grill
12 Verve nightclub
13 Marie’s Fish Shack
14 Q Bar and Jazz Lounge
15 Buzz Seafood & Grill
16 Spinnakers Beach Bar and Carvery
17 Gros Islet Jump Up (Friday nights)
18 Irie Bar

AdRef:VR2440

A very

welcome sight

After 2,700 nautical miles of Atlantic, the sight of IGY’s Rodney Bay Marina is a very welcome one.

It is not just appealing to ARC race participants.

“The facility is self-contained. You have a boatyard, duty free fuel, customs and immigration and a duty-free chandlery,” says the marina’s general manager Sean Devaux.

Devaux speaks with an accent that defies easy placement. His father is from Trinidad, his mother from Canada but he grew up in Saint Lucia where the Devaux family has connections going back 275 years.

The marina’s duty-free status is particularly attractive.

“If your vessel is foreign registered then you will be allowed duty-free status. If you come across on the ARC and you have blown an engine or a sail, you can now bring that in duty free.”

Devaux is justifiably proud of the marina’s five gold anchor status as part of the global scheme operated by the Yacht Harbour Association and the Marina Industries Association.

KEY

1 IGY Rodney Bay marina
2 Rodney Bay Marina Boatyard
3 Rodney Bay Sails
4 Boardwalk Bar
5 Saint Lucia Tourism Authority
6 The Marketplace grocery store
7 Bay Gardens Hotel and Inn
8 Massy Stores supermarket
9 Spice of India
10 Tapas on the Bay
11 Jamrock Reggae Café and Grill
12 Verve nightclub
13 Marie’s Fish Shack
14 Q Bar and Jazz Lounge
15 Buzz Seafood & Grill
16 Spinnakers Beach Bar and Carvery
17 Gros Islet Jump Up (Friday nights)
18 Irie Bar

A very

welcome sight

After 2,700 nautical miles of Atlantic, the sight of IGY’s Rodney Bay Marina is a very welcome one.

It is not just appealing to ARC race participants.

“The facility is self-contained. You have a boatyard, duty free fuel, customs and immigration and a duty-free chandlery,” says the marina’s general manager Sean Devaux.

Devaux speaks with an accent that defies easy placement. His father is from Trinidad, his mother from Canada but he grew up in Saint Lucia where the Devaux family has connections going back 275 years.

The marina’s duty-free status is particularly attractive.

“If your vessel is foreign registered then you will be allowed duty-free status. If you come across on the ARC and you have blown an engine or a sail, you can now bring that in duty free.”

Devaux is justifiably proud of the marina’s five gold anchor status as part of the global scheme operated by the Yacht Harbour Association and the Marina Industries Association.

KEY

1 IGY Rodney Bay marina
2 Rodney Bay Marina Boatyard
3 Rodney Bay Sails
4 Boardwalk Bar
5 Saint Lucia Tourism Authority
6 The Marketplace grocery store
7 Bay Gardens Hotel and Inn
8 Massy Stores supermarket
9 Spice of India
10 Tapas on the Bay
11 Jamrock Reggae Café and Grill
12 Verve nightclub
13 Marie’s Fish Shack
14 Q Bar and Jazz Lounge
15 Buzz Seafood & Grill
16 Spinnakers Beach Bar and Carvery
17 Gros Islet Jump Up (Friday nights)
18 Irie Bar

Rodney Bay need to know

253 berths including 32 megayacht berths

Max length: 285’ (86.8m)

Max draft: 13’ (3.9m)

Max beam: 60’ (18.3m)

30 amp, 50 amp/100 amp SP, 100 amp 3P/480v 100 amp 3P

YPI hardwire

Wi-fi

High-speed fuel dock

Provisioning services

Waste disposal services

VHF channel 16. Entrance channel waypoint is at 14o 04’ 32.72” N 60o 56’ 55.63” W

75-ton Marine Travelift with remote control (28’ inside clear width and 26’ inside clear height)

40-ton Marine Travelift self- propelled boat trailer with remote control

Accommodation for 120 boats on hard. • Three refit shelters (36’W x 36’H x 70’L)

Boat repair management

Fuel, oil, water and ice services

Portable and fixed pump-out services

Vessel caretaking

Painting – antifouling and topsides

Sail and rigging repairs

Osmosis repairs

Carpentry & teak deck installations

Fabrication and welding services

Electric systems including generation and distribution

Engine systems including shafting, cutlass bearings and propellers

Customs opening hours

Monday – Thursday
8:00am – 4:30pm

Friday 8:00am – 6:00pm

Saturday – Sunday
8:00am – 4:30pm

Weekends & Holidays Overtime Hours (after 4:30pm fees apply) Port Entry Charges:

Passenger dues: EC$15/person.

“It is a tremendous recognition of what we do,” he says, “particularly as the requirements are constantly changing and it is the third time in a row we have achieved this.”

One area which where the requirements have increased recently is in relation to the environment.

“We provide pump-out facilities, both mobile and fixed, and we are the only marina in the Southern Caribbean that has a recycling programme. This year we are projected to save 18,000 to 20,000 tonnes from going to landfill.”

IGY Rodney Bay Marina is one of 18 in 12 different countries that come under the IGY umbrella – some, like Rodney Bay, are owned, managed and marketed by the country while others are managed or just marketed by the company.

Being part of a network can be a great help.

“We can offer that network to clients who are sailing north. We had a guy from the ARC last year who was sailing up to New York. We made his reservations all the way up,” he says.

High levels of service are hugely important for IGY.

Devaux tells a story that shows just how far they go to keep clients happy.

He says, “I had a call at about 10 at night form a private jet pilot saying the airport lights were not on. The pilot, one of our clients, had communicated his arrival to the wrong airport – he had contacted the one in the south but he was lined up for the one in the north. I told him to make a few circles and called the ground handling company who were able to get there and turn the lights on. Our client has never forgotten that.”

The marina is also something of an entertainment destination with bars such as the Boardwalk as well as a choice of restaurants – Rituals for sushi, Elena’s for Italian favourites, Bosun’s for Thai food, La Mesa for Argentinian steak, Sea Salt for seafood dishes as well as Café Olé for light bites.

The marina is also the venue for the annual ARC party which tends to take place later on in December when the vast majority of the boats have arrived.

“The party is to say thanks to ARC and the Saint Lucia Tourism Authority. We put on a steel band, fire dancers and try to make it unique. We have lots of big boats in and up to 1,200 people turn up,” he says.

One recent challenge is the reclassification of the hurricane zone by many insurers over the summer months.

“Unfortunately, because of the issues with hurricanes in the last two years, many insurers have now changed their latitude of coverage whereas previously we were classified as a safe haven,” says Devaux.

Since then, some local insurance companies have come on board to offer coverage.

Devaux wants to get the value that yachts bring to Saint Lucia better
recognised.

“It will take time,” he says, “but there are real benefits to the Saint Lucian economy.”

Return to harbour listing

Rodney Bay need to know

253 berths including 32 megayacht berths

Max length: 285’ (86.8m)

Max draft: 13’ (3.9m)

Max beam: 60’ (18.3m)

30 amp, 50 amp/100 amp SP, 100 amp 3P/480v 100 amp 3P

YPI hardwire

Wi-fi

High-speed fuel dock

Provisioning services

Waste disposal services

VHF channel 16. Entrance channel waypoint is at 14o 04’ 32.72” N 60o 56’ 55.63” W

75-ton Marine Travelift with remote control (28’ inside clear width and 26’ inside clear height)

40-ton Marine Travelift self- propelled boat trailer with remote control

Accommodation for 120 boats on hard. • Three refit shelters (36’W x 36’H x 70’L)

Boat repair management

Fuel, oil, water and ice services

Portable and fixed pump-out services

Vessel caretaking

Painting – antifouling and topsides

Sail and rigging repairs

Osmosis repairs

Carpentry & teak deck installations

Fabrication and welding services

Electric systems including generation and distribution

Engine systems including shafting, cutlass bearings and propellers

Customs opening hours

Monday – Thursday
8:00am – 4:30pm

Friday 8:00am – 6:00pm

Saturday – Sunday
8:00am – 4:30pm

Weekends & Holidays Overtime Hours (after 4:30pm fees apply) Port Entry Charges:

Passenger dues: EC$15/person.

“It is a tremendous recognition of what we do,” he says, “particularly as the requirements are constantly changing and it is the third time in a row we have achieved this.”

One area which where the requirements have increased recently is in relation to the environment.

“We provide pump-out facilities, both mobile and fixed, and we are the only marina in the Southern Caribbean that has a recycling programme. This year we are projected to save 18,000 to 20,000 tonnes from going to landfill.”

IGY Rodney Bay Marina is one of 18 in 12 different countries that come under the IGY umbrella – some, like Rodney Bay, are owned, managed and marketed by the country while others are managed or just marketed by the company.

Being part of a network can be a great help.

“We can offer that network to clients who are sailing north. We had a guy from the ARC last year who was sailing up to New York. We made his reservations all the way up,” he says.

High levels of service are hugely important for IGY.

Devaux tells a story that shows just how far they go to keep clients happy.

He says, “I had a call at about 10 at night form a private jet pilot saying the airport lights were not on. The pilot, one of our clients, had communicated his arrival to the wrong airport – he had contacted the one in the south but he was lined up for the one in the north. I told him to make a few circles and called the ground handling company who were able to get there and turn the lights on. Our client has never forgotten that.”

The marina is also something of an entertainment destination with bars such as the Boardwalk as well as a choice of restaurants – Rituals for sushi, Elena’s for Italian favourites, Bosun’s for Thai food, La Mesa for Argentinian steak, Sea Salt for seafood dishes as well as Café Olé for light bites.

The marina is also the venue for the annual ARC party which tends to take place later on in December when the vast majority of the boats have arrived.

“The party is to say thanks to ARC and the Saint Lucia Tourism Authority. We put on a steel band, fire dancers and try to make it unique. We have lots of big boats in and up to 1,200 people turn up,” he says.

One recent challenge is the reclassification of the hurricane zone by many insurers over the summer months.

“Unfortunately, because of the issues with hurricanes in the last two years, many insurers have now changed their latitude of coverage whereas previously we were classified as a safe haven,” says Devaux.

Since then, some local insurance companies have come on board to offer coverage.

Devaux wants to get the value that yachts bring to Saint Lucia better
recognised.

“It will take time,” he says, “but there are real benefits to the Saint Lucian economy.”

Return to harbour listing

Docking at

THE CASTRIES

The capital city of Saint Lucia, Castries is rich in history and only a few minutes’ walk from the cruise berths
Return to Harbour Listing

Docking at

THE CASTRIES

The capital city of Saint Lucia, Castries is rich in history and only a few minutes’ walk from the cruise berths
Return to Harbour Listing

Docking at

THE CASTRIES

The capital city of Saint Lucia, Castries is rich in history and only a few minutes’ walk from the cruise berths
Return to Harbour Listing

Not just a dock

a destination

Marina manager Troy Blanchard – you can miss him on the boardwalk in his crisp white shirt, gold chains and
wearing a permanent broad smile – says his favourite visitors to the marina are the beautiful single-masted J-class racing yachts.

One of the major attractions of Marigot Bay is its reputation as a “hurricane hole”. The surrounding mountains cradle the bay and protect visiting boats from rough tides and high winds.

Blanchard says that during a tropical storm in 2018 with winds of 70 knots and gusts of up to 100 knots, the winds didn’t exceed 20 knits in the bay.

While Saint Lucia is technically within the hurricane belt, it is far enough south and west that it misses most of the storms, says Blanchard.

KEY

1 Marigot Bay Resort and Marina
2 Marigot Beach Club & Dive Resort/DOOlittle’s
3 Oasis Marigot, St Lucia Villas
4 Mango Beach Inn
5 Root’s Bar
6 Chateau Mygo, House of Seafood
7 Hassy’s Bar
8 Pirate Bay Chop House and Ale
9 Roots 2 Bar
10 Julietta’s

AdRef:WSK1660

Not just a dock

a destination

Marina manager Troy Blanchard – you can miss him on the boardwalk in his crisp white shirt, gold chains and
wearing a permanent broad smile – says his favourite visitors to the marina are the beautiful single-masted J-class racing yachts.

One of the major attractions of Marigot Bay is its reputation as a “hurricane hole”. The surrounding mountains cradle the bay and protect visiting boats from rough tides and high winds.

Blanchard says that during a tropical storm in 2018 with winds of 70 knots and gusts of up to 100 knots, the winds didn’t exceed 20 knits in the bay.

While Saint Lucia is technically within the hurricane belt, it is far enough south and west that it misses most of the storms, says Blanchard.

KEY

1 Marigot Bay Resort and Marina
2 Marigot Beach Club & Dive Resort/DOOlittle’s
3 Oasis Marigot, St Lucia Villas
4 Mango Beach Inn
5 Root’s Bar
6 Chateau Mygo, House of Seafood
7 Hassy’s Bar
8 Pirate Bay Chop House and Ale
9 Roots 2 Bar
10 Julietta’s

Not just a dock

a destination

Marina manager Troy Blanchard – you can miss him on the boardwalk in his crisp white shirt, gold chains and
wearing a permanent broad smile – says his favourite visitors to the marina are the beautiful single-masted J-class racing yachts.

One of the major attractions of Marigot Bay is its reputation as a “hurricane hole”. The surrounding mountains cradle the bay and protect visiting boats from rough tides and high winds.

Blanchard says that during a tropical storm in 2018 with winds of 70 knots and gusts of up to 100 knots, the winds didn’t exceed 20 knits in the bay.

While Saint Lucia is technically within the hurricane belt, it is far enough south and west that it misses most of the storms, says Blanchard.

KEY

1 Marigot Bay Resort and Marina
2 Marigot Beach Club & Dive Resort/DOOlittle’s
3 Oasis Marigot, St Lucia Villas
4 Mango Beach Inn
5 Root’s Bar
6 Chateau Mygo, House of Seafood
7 Hassy’s Bar
8 Pirate Bay Chop House and Ale
9 Roots 2 Bar
10 Julietta’s

Marigot Bay need to know

Diesel/gasoline fuel dock
dispensaries brought directly to
vessel via trolley boat

Electricity – 110v/220v 50/100 amps 50 or 60 Hz; 410v 125/200 amps 50 Hz

Water – metered taps at all berths with 50psi treated, potable (drinking) water

Complimentary WiFi

Complimentary cable TV

Garbage disposal – twice daily collections from each berth

24 hour security and CCTV

VHF channel 12. Entrance channel waypoint is at 13o , 58.05’N 61o , 01.90’W

Electrical, electronic, and hydraulic repairs (ASEA agent on-site)

Hull cleaning and polishing

Paint and FRP repairs

Varnishing

Valeting – interior and exterior

Underwater cleaning and inspection

Sail and canvas repairs

Engine, generator, and outboard maintenance

Sheet winch, windlass, and capstan maintenance

Waste oil disposal

Cooking gas – bottle exchange and refill service

Yachts not arriving from international waters may stay for 72 hours without clearing customs and immigration.

Visitors can request to stay up to six months in the first instance and bona fide visitors and yachtsmen can expect to be granted a minimum of 42 day with an EC$100 fee per 21 day period.

Marigot Bay, one third of the way down Saint Lucia’s western coast,is one of the most popular destinations for yachts arriving in the country’s sparkling waters. Marigot Bay Marina has 42 berths and 20 mooring buoys with berthing for yachts up to 280 ft in length. It is naturally deep – in the Second World War, German submarines came into the bay – and can handle up to 20ft drafts.

“If a hurricane is forecast, within an hour every dock space and every mooring is taken. Boats will even tie up in the mangroves,” he says.

Yachts don’t just come here when the wind gets up though. It is a spectacularly beautiful place to moor and the facilities are second to none.

Marina guests can make use of the Marigot Bay Personal Assistants to arrange on-land and off-shore excursions.

The requests are sometimes challenging but nothing fazes Blanchard and he and his team deliver with that famous smile.

“We had to arrange to fly someone’s pet from Argentina on a private jet once,” he says.

If the team discover that an owner has a young family on board, they will go out of their way to make the children welcome too.

One amazing benefit of being here is that all marina guests get free access to the resort. “Guests of the marina are also guests of the resort,” says Blanchard. “The owner can get off and enjoy the pool area, the spa, the restaurants and the fitness suite. It’s not just a dock but a destination.”

Return to harbour listing

Marigot Bay need to know

Diesel/gasoline fuel dock
dispensaries brought directly to
vessel via trolley boat

Electricity – 110v/220v 50/100 amps 50 or 60 Hz; 410v 125/200 amps 50 Hz

Water – metered taps at all berths with 50psi treated, potable (drinking) water

Complimentary WiFi

Complimentary cable TV

Garbage disposal – twice daily collections from each berth

24 hour security and CCTV

VHF channel 12. Entrance channel waypoint is at 13o , 58.05’N 61o , 01.90’W

Electrical, electronic, and hydraulic repairs (ASEA agent on-site)

Hull cleaning and polishing

Paint and FRP repairs

Varnishing

Valeting – interior and exterior

Underwater cleaning and inspection

Sail and canvas repairs

Engine, generator, and outboard maintenance

Sheet winch, windlass, and capstan maintenance

Waste oil disposal

Cooking gas – bottle exchange and refill service

Yachts not arriving from international waters may stay for 72 hours without clearing customs and immigration.

Visitors can request to stay up to six months in the first instance and bona fide visitors and yachtsmen can expect to be granted a minimum of 42 day with an EC$100 fee per 21 day period.

Marigot Bay, one third of the way down Saint Lucia’s western coast,is one of the most popular destinations for yachts arriving in the country’s sparkling waters. Marigot Bay Marina has 42 berths and 20 mooring buoys with berthing for yachts up to 280 ft in length. It is naturally deep – in the Second World War, German submarines came into the bay – and can handle up to 20ft drafts.

“If a hurricane is forecast, within an hour every dock space and every mooring is taken. Boats will even tie up in the mangroves,” he says.

Yachts don’t just come here when the wind gets up though. It is a spectacularly beautiful place to moor and the facilities are second to none.

Marina guests can make use of the Marigot Bay Personal Assistants to arrange on-land and off-shore excursions.

The requests are sometimes challenging but nothing fazes Blanchard and he and his team deliver with that famous smile.

“We had to arrange to fly someone’s pet from Argentina on a private jet once,” he says.

If the team discover that an owner has a young family on board, they will go out of their way to make the children welcome too.

One amazing benefit of being here is that all marina guests get free access to the resort. “Guests of the marina are also guests of the resort,” says Blanchard. “The owner can get off and enjoy the pool area, the spa, the restaurants and the fitness suite. It’s not just a dock but a destination.”

Return to harbour listing

Marigot Bay need to know

Diesel/gasoline fuel dock
dispensaries brought directly to
vessel via trolley boat

Electricity – 110v/220v 50/100 amps 50 or 60 Hz; 410v 125/200 amps 50 Hz

Water – metered taps at all berths with 50psi treated, potable (drinking) water

Complimentary WiFi

Complimentary cable TV

Garbage disposal – twice daily collections from each berth

24 hour security and CCTV

VHF channel 12. Entrance channel waypoint is at 13o , 58.05’N 61o , 01.90’W

Electrical, electronic, and hydraulic repairs (ASEA agent on-site)

Hull cleaning and polishing

Paint and FRP repairs

Varnishing

Valeting – interior and exterior

Underwater cleaning and inspection

Sail and canvas repairs

Engine, generator, and outboard maintenance

Sheet winch, windlass, and capstan maintenance

Waste oil disposal

Cooking gas – bottle exchange and refill service

Yachts not arriving from international waters may stay for 72 hours without clearing customs and immigration.

Visitors can request to stay up to six months in the first instance and bona fide visitors and yachtsmen can expect to be granted a minimum of 42 day with an EC$100 fee per 21 day period.

Marigot Bay, one third of the way down Saint Lucia’s western coast,is one of the most popular destinations for yachts arriving in the country’s sparkling waters. Marigot Bay Marina has 42 berths and 20 mooring buoys with berthing for yachts up to 280 ft in length. It is naturally deep – in the Second World War, German submarines came into the bay – and can handle up to 20ft drafts.

“If a hurricane is forecast, within an hour every dock space and every mooring is taken. Boats will even tie up in the mangroves,” he says.

Yachts don’t just come here when the wind gets up though. It is a spectacularly beautiful place to moor and the facilities are second to none.

Marina guests can make use of the Marigot Bay Personal Assistants to arrange on-land and off-shore excursions.

The requests are sometimes challenging but nothing fazes Blanchard and he and his team deliver with that famous smile.

“We had to arrange to fly someone’s pet from Argentina on a private jet once,” he says.

If the team discover that an owner has a young family on board, they will go out of their way to make the children welcome too.

One amazing benefit of being here is that all marina guests get free access to the resort. “Guests of the marina are also guests of the resort,” says Blanchard. “The owner can get off and enjoy the pool area, the spa, the restaurants and the fitness suite. It’s not just a dock but a destination.”

Return to harbour listing

Docking at

SOUFRIERE

Soufrière is a town on the West Coast of Saint Lucia. It possesses many of Saint Lucia’s top attractions, including the Sulphur Springs and Mineral Mud Baths
Return to Harbour Listing

Docking at

SOUFRIERE

Soufrière is a town on the West Coast of Saint Lucia. It possesses many of Saint Lucia’s top attractions, including the Sulphur Springs and Mineral Mud Baths
Return to Harbour Listing

Docking at

SOUFRIERE

Soufrière is a town on the West Coast of Saint Lucia. It possesses many of Saint Lucia’s top attractions, including the Sulphur Springs and Mineral Mud Baths
Return to Harbour Listing

Docking at

VIEUX FORT

Port Vieux Fort, located at the southernmost point of Saint Lucia, named after a fort that used to watch out towards Saint Vincent to the south
Return to Harbour Listing
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